Hashimoto’s Syndrome: something else to consider

Posted: August 14, 2012 in diagnostic, diet, Gall Bladder, nutrition, treatments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

To make a long story short, Hashimoto’s Syndrome is an autoimmune/thyroid disorder which can have similar results (and causes) to Celiac Disease. Basically unwanted protein infiltration through a leaky or compromised gut. Supposedly there are some 30 million undiagnosed cases of Hashimoto’s Syndrome in the USA. You can read all the specific details here on Wikipedia.

How does it relate to gall bladder problems? Well, the same problems from Hashimoto’s and Celiac Disease can also incapacitate your gall badder. If you are a gall bladder patient, you may want to test yourself for Hashimoto’s Syndrome.

The wife of my friend Bill (who is writing a book on the subject) has Hashimoto’s and has found successful treatment through dietary changes:

My wife has found that by partioning her meals – eating protein first and giving the stomach at least 30 minutes to break the protein down into assimilable fragments that can be digested by the upper gut enzymes before the fragments have a chance to leak through the gut wall, and then eating the vegetable portion of her meal, almost completely eliminated the auto-immune response.

Bill goes on further to say:

Second let me URGE any reader who has been diagnosed with any kind of gut issue – celiac, IBS, crohns, SIBO, etc – and ESPECIALLY gluten intolerance! – get yourself tested for Hashimoto’s. In most cases, Hashi’s is confirmed by two antibodies labs: anti-TPO and TgAb. The first antibody, anti-TPO, attacks an enzyme normally found in your thyroid gland, called the Thyroid Peroxidase, which is important in the production of thyroid hormones. The second antibody, TgAb, attacks the key protein in the thyroid gland, the thyroglobulin, which is essential in the production of the T4 and T3 thyroid hormones. If you have insurance you may find that your doc resists ordering the tests – though for the life of me I don’t know why. We have no insurance and the damn things only cost @ $60 – and they are absolutely diagnostic. SO – do not let your Doc tell you that since your T4 tests are normal there’s no need for the anti-body tests. MAKE them order the damn tests ( voice of frustrated experience here).Then, if it turns out that you do have Hashi’s, there are several well-established pathways back to health.

Last, let me say that after years of working on this together with my wife and having to do almost all our own research since docs just don’t seem to know or care ( gastroenterologists are the worst IMO) we are convinced that whole-body inflammation is the bottom-line, underlying issue not just in Hashi’s but in a huge range of disease – and most gut disease in particular. Get control of the inflammation and you get control of the disease. A quick story to illustrate this. Within a month of eliminating grain, dairy and eggs from her diet my wife, who had weighed 110 pounds all her life before all this began and then for years she see-sawed between 125-140 but the amount of food she was taking in did not vary and she never ate junk food, sweets etc – the stuff that “makes you fat” – within a month she was back down to 110. But here’s the kicker – she had zero loose skin, the way you do when you lose weight, especially in places like the back of your arms. That’s because her extra weight wasn’t fat – it was inflamed tissue. Once the inflammation was under control, the tissues returned to normal state, and there was no extra loose skin. None. So in my mind that is pretty good evidence that an awful lot of the obesity that’s around these days probably isn’t fat, but inflamation. Just an opinion.

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