Archive for the ‘supplements’ Category

I have begun paving the trail to have a new supplement manufactured for those of us who no longer have gall bladders (or have lost the function of one that is still there). Since all of the bile supplements on the market are uncoated, they are mostly ineffective. I have tested lots of them and not had any results other than indigestion. The reasoning, so far as I can figure, is this:

In a perfect world, bile enters your system in your small intestine for a reason. 1 to emulsify fats, and 2 to reduce the acidity of your incoming stomach contents. Bile is a base. If the bile enters your stomach, it will increase the pH (reduce the acidity) of your stomach contents, leading to reduced digestion or outright negation of the pill you took.

In order to get the bile to the right place, it needs to be coated with something that will make it last through the acid environment of the stomach, and then break down in a more base environment like the intestine. Such coatings do exist, but none are presently used on bile tablets.

I believe that one of the greatest contributing factors to the side effects we gallbladderless people suffer is from pH imbalances in the digestive tract: food is too acidic as it travels through your intestine due to reduced bile output, and then the whole tract is too base the rest of the time because the bile is just constantly leaking into your system.

With a coated tablet, I hope to be able to, in effect, replicate the environment we once had when our gall bladders worked. Or get it reasonably close. We shall see. And you can help.

I am still in the formulation stage, but once I have the first test batch made, I will be looking for some volunteers to test it out for me and provide feedback. If you are interested, please contact me here or via email (media@evlmedia.com) and I’ll let you know as soon as it’s available.

Advertisements

I first read about Cholestyramine during my research into Habba Syndrome. Dr. Habba has been successfully treating some of his patients with it, so I decided to give it a try.

Long story short: My results were excellent, to the point where I no longer need to take it.

That said, I did not exactly do a controlled experiment. I coupled my taking of Cholestyramine in combination with a gluten-free diet. Anyhow, my experience is as follows…

In order to bypass the absurd process of getting a Cholestyramine prescription through standard channels by seeing a doctor (who knows nothing about gall bladders nor nutrition) who may or may not agree with my dietary experiment, I enlisted the help of a friend of mine who is a naturepathic doctor. He wrote me the scrip and I went to get it filled at the local pharmacy (in this case I was in Portland, OR).

I had a choice of foil envelopes with individual doses, or a big can of powder with a scoop. I chose half envelopes and half self-serve scoop can. The sugar-free formula, which I would have preferred, was unavailable.

As it is, the sugar formula still tastes bad but not horrible, orangelike, reminiscent of a vitamin-C tablet but not as sweet. It would be passable if it was sweeter. Why bother putting sugar in it at all if you aren’t going to use it enough to make it palatable? One could possibly benefit by adding some sugar-free sweetener to your mix, but when it’s all said and done, it’s not bad enough to warrant the extra attention: you just chug your glass of yuck-tasting stuff and get on with your life.

Within a few hours, after my first dose, I was already cured of my instant-run-to-the-toilet problems. It worked so well that I did not need to defecate for a full 24 hours. When I did, it was more solid than I had seen in months, and it was a strange grey color.

I also found that I was much less hungry, and got fuller faster from smaller meals. Obviously I had more time to absorb those calories and nutrients. It makes me wonder how many wasted calories I was taking in that just flew through me.

I continued to take the Cholestyramine twice a day for the next month. The grey color eventually went away, and I ended up becoming so constipated that I had to reduce the dose by half after a week, and then to 1/2 dose once per day (1/4) after 2 weeks. I achieved a state of normalcy after that, and continued to take the Cholestyramine until it ran out 3 months later.

I would have continued to take it but I was then in Uruguay and it was not available there, nor could I find it in neighboring Argentina. Knowing full well the disaster that befalls anyone who ships in “drugs” or even vitamins to these countries, I opted to simply stop taking the Cholestyramine.

Fortunately, I found that I no longer needed it. The results of my digestion showed no difference after removing it from my daily routine. I assume what happened was that the Cholestyramine provided me with the break I needed for my bowels to heal up in the absence of gluten. I know, I should have done a more scientific study but I was tired of crapping my guts out every 20 minutes.

If you are one who suffers from diarrhea as a symptom of having your gall bladder removed, I highly recommend you give Cholestyramine a try. Cholestyramine is also sold under the name Questran, Questran Light (sugar-free), and Cholybar. Other bile acid sequestrants that do the same job are sold under the names Cholesevelam, Cholestagel, Welchol, Colestipol, and Colestid.